Multifunctional network device for autonomous activity in the city environment. Its main function is communication and propaganda through the Wi-FI wireless standard. This is the hacktivism diy response to attempts by the authorities in different countries to control the Internet. The project serves as an example of the possible opposition and decentralisation of networks to ensure communications and provide notifications irrespective of whether there is access to the global internet or certain restrictions are applied.

The device consists of three standalone Wi-Fi access points based on the esp8266 chip and Arduino Mega board, which is the core brain of the system. The device is also equipped with a keyboard for typing text and OLED screen for convenience of use. It can function based on a built-in battery (up to eight hours), or any power bank/telephone charge.

- When typing the text on the keyboard, I can at any moment create/change network names, using the Latin alphabet or Cyrillic script. This makes it possible for the actual network names to serve as a way of transmitting specific information: personal messages, calls for action, mottos, notifications, or any other statement. As all state-of-the-art smartphones, tablets and computers are equipped with Wi-Fi modules, it is highly likely that such a message could be read at a radius of up to 100 metres, depending on the actual space. Each network name may have up to 32x symbols, and if all three networks are used – 96 symbols. In addition, in crowded places (for example, the metro), numerous users constantly look for networks, and as there are usually precious few external networks, it is highly likely that numerous people will see the message when they choose a connection while underground.

- If the user is connected to one of the networks (none of the networks have passwords), then the captive page (welcome page/registration page) jumps out at the user. This page may have any deliberately assigned content, and inter alia, lead to other pages located on the standalone servers of all three hotspots. This will make it possible to deliver vast volumes of information, constituting an autonomous Internet to all intents and purposes. The text of A Cyberpunk Manifesto by Christian Kirtchev (1997) is placed on the demo page used in the video documentation.”

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