Content for FLEET.Edu

FLEET.Edu

The ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (or FLEET) is a collaboration of physicists, electrical engineers, chemists and material scientists from seven Australian universities developing ultra-low energy electronics aimed at reducing energy use in information technology (IT). The Centre was funded in the 2017 ARC funding round.

Quantifying Spin In WTE2 For Future Spintronics

“A RMIT-led, international collaboration published this week has observed large in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in a quantum spin Hall insulator and the spin quantization axis of the edge states can be well-defined. A quantum spin Hall insulator (QSHIs) is …

Stress Can Be Good For You: Enhancing Piezoelectric Properties Under Pressure

“Stress enhances the properties of a promising material for future technologies. UNSW researchers find a new exotic state of one of the most promising multiferroic materials, with exciting implications for future technologies using these enhanced properties. Combining a careful balance …

Home-Grown Semiconductors For Faster, Smaller Electronics

“‘Growing’ electronic components directly onto a semiconductor block avoids messy, noisy oxidation scattering that slows and impedes electronic operation. A UNSW study out this month shows that the resulting high-mobility components are ideal candidates for high-frequency, ultra-small electronic devices, quantum …

Mixing A Cocktail Of Topology And Magnetism For Future Electronics

“A new Monash review throws the spotlight on recent research in heterostructures of topological insulators and magnetic materials. In such heterostructures, the interesting interplay of magnetism and topology can give rise to new phenomena such as quantum anomalous Hall insulators …

Qubits Comprised Of Holes Could Be The Trick To Build Faster, Larger Quantum Computers

“A new study indicates holes the solution to operational speed/coherence trade-off, potential scaling up of qubits to a mini-quantum computer. Quantum computers are predicted to be much more powerful and functional than today’s ‘classical’ computers. One way to …

Liquid metals come to the rescue of semiconductors

“Moore’s law is an empirical suggestion describing that the number of transistors doubles every few years in integrated circuits (ICs). However, Moore’s law has started to fail as transistors are now so small that the current silicon-based technologies …

Liquid Metal Synthesis For Better Piezoelectrics: Atomically-thin Tin-monosulfide

“RMIT-UNSW collaboration applies liquid-metal synthesis to piezoelectrics, advancing future flexible, wearable electronics, and biosensors drawing their power from the body’s movements. Materials such as atomically-thin tin-monosulfide (SnS) are predicted to exhibit strong piezoelectric properties, converting mechanical forces or …

New Spin Directions In Pyrite An Encouraging Sign For Future Spintronics

“first theoretical demonstration of both in-plane and out-of-plane spin highly energy- and direction- dependent behaviour discovered interplay between surface and bulk states plays a critical role in surface spin texture A Monash University study revealing new spin textures in pyrite …