RIKEN.Edu

Riken is a large scientific research institute in Japan. Founded in 1917, it now has about 3,000 scientists on seven campuses across Japan, including the main site at Wakō, Saitama Prefecture, just outside Tokyo. Riken is a Designated National Research and Development Institute, and was formerly an Independent Administrative Institution. "Riken" is a contraction of the formal name Rikagaku Kenkyūjo, and its full name in Japanese is Kokuritsu Kenkyū Kaihatsu Hōjin Rikagaku Kenkyūsho and in English is the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. Riken conducts research in many areas of science, including physics, chemistry, biology, genomics, medical science, engineering, high-performance computing and computational science, and ranging from basic research to practical applications with 485 partners worldwide. It is almost entirely funded by the Japanese government, and its annual budget is about ¥88 billion (US$790 million).

Main Content

Dark-matter candidate could display stringy effects in the lab

“Calculations show how theoretical ‘axionic strings’ could create odd behavior if produced in exotic materials in the lab A hypothetical particle that could solve one of the biggest puzzles in cosmology just got a little less mysterious. A RIKEN physicist …

Researchers find “missing link” between magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars

“Researchers from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research have made observations of a new magnetar, called Swift J1818.0-1607, which challenges current knowledge about two types of extreme stars, known as magnetars and pulsars. The research, just published in The …

Japan’s Fugaku gains title as world’s fastest supercomputer

“The supercomputer Fugaku, which is being developed jointly by RIKEN and Fujitsu Limited based on Arm® technology, has taken the top spot on the Top500 listThe webpage will open in a new tab., a ranking of the world’s fastest …

Scientists succeed in measuring electron spin qubit without demolishing it

“A group of scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Japan have succeeded in taking repeated measurements of the spin of an electron in a silicon quantum dot (QD), without changing the spin in the process. This …

Nuclear “magic numbers” collapse beyond the doubly magic Nickel 78

“An international collaboration led by scientists from the University of Hong Kong, RIKEN (Japan), and CEA (France) have used the RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-base Science to show that 34 is a “magic number …

Quantum interferometry demonstrated in silicon at more practical temperatures

“A silicon-based transistor that displays quantum interference effects at useful temperatures paves the way for highly sensitive sensors Using a silicon-based transistor similar to those found in everyday electronics, RIKEN researchers have produced a functional quantum ‘qubit’—the quantum equivalent …

Superconductor films convert heat into electricity

“Films of a superconductor show excellent thermoelectric properties at very low film thicknesses When thinned down to a sheet a few atoms thick, the superconductor iron selenide (FeSe) can efficiently convert heat into electricity, researchers at RIKEN have discovered1. This …

Physicists uncover the topological origin of surface electromagnetic waves

“Maxwell’s electromagnetic theory, which was formulated 150 years ago, was one of the greatest breakthroughs in physics. It united electricity and magnetism, provided an ultimate description of electromagnetic waves, including light, and anticipated relativity and the field theories of …

Photoreactions activate magnetic nanoswitches

“Light induces photoreactions that activate the switch of the magnetic orientation of 2D materials dispersed in water. A way to use light to induce changes in the optical and magnetic properties of water-dispersed titanate nanosheets has been devised by RIKEN …

Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing

“Spin-based quantum computers have the potential to tackle difficult mathematical problems that cannot be solved using ordinary computers, but many problems remain in making these machines scalable. Now, an international group of researchers led by the RIKEN Center for Emergent …