Content for MIT.Edu

MIT.Edu

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Institute is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant university, with an urban campus that extends more than a mile (1.6 km) alongside the Charles River. The Institute also encompasses a number of major off-campus facilities such as the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, the Bates Center, and the Haystack Observatory, as well as affiliated laboratories such as the Broad and Whitehead Institutes. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, MIT adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction in applied science and engineering. It has since played a key role in the development of many aspects of modern science, engineering, mathematics, and technology, and is widely known for its innovation and academic strength, making it one of the most prestigious institutions of higher learning in the world.

Putting clear bounds on uncertainty

“Computer scientists want to know the exact limits in our ability to clean up, and reconstruct, partly blurred images. In science and technology, there has been a long and steady drive toward improving the accuracy of measurements of all kinds …

Can you trust your quantum simulator?

“A new technique helps verify the accuracy of experiments that probe the strange behavior of atomic-scale systems. At the scale of individual atoms, physics gets weird. Researchers are working to reveal, harness, and control these strange quantum effects using quantum …

Computers that power self-driving cars could be a huge driver of global carbon emissions

“Study shows that if autonomous vehicles are widely adopted, hardware efficiency will need to advance rapidly to keep computing-related emissions in check. In the future, the energy needed to run the powerful computers on board a global fleet of autonomous …

MIT engineers grow “perfect” atom-thin materials on industrial silicon wafers

“Their technique could allow chip manufacturers to produce next-generation transistors based on materials other than silicon. True to Moore’s Law, the number of transistors on a microchip has doubled every year since the 1960s. But this trajectory is predicted …

Engineering in harmony

“AeroAstro major and accomplished tuba player Frederick Ajisafe relishes the community he has found in the MIT Wind Ensemble. How does an ensemble play music together while apart? This was the question facing Frederick Ajisafe and the rest of the …

Unpacking the “black box” to build better AI models

“Stefanie Jegelka seeks to understand how machine-learning models behave, to help researchers build more robust models for applications in biology, computer vision, optimization, and more. When deep learning models are deployed in the real world, perhaps to detect financial fraud …

New quantum computing architecture could be used to connect large-scale devices

“Researchers have demonstrated directional photon emission, the first step toward extensible quantum interconnects. Quantum computers hold the promise of performing certain tasks that are intractable even on the world’s most powerful supercomputers. In the future, scientists anticipate using quantum …

Strengthening electron-triggered light emission

“A new method can produce a hundredfold increase in light emissions from a type of electron-photon coupling, which is key to electron microscopes and other technologies. The way electrons interact with photons of light is a key part of many …

New sensor uses MRI to detect light deep in the brain

“Using this approach, researchers can map how light spreads in opaque environments. Using a specialized MRI sensor, MIT researchers have shown that they can detect light deep within tissues such as the brain. Imaging light in deep tissues is extremely …

Putting a new spin on computer hardware

“Luqiao Liu utilizes a quantum property known as electron spin to build low-power, high-performance computer memories and programmable computer chips. Luqiao Liu was the kind of kid who would rather take his toys apart to see how they worked than …