Content for KU.Edu

KU.Edu

The University of Kansas (KU) is a public research university with its main campus in Lawrence, Kansas, and several satellite campuses, research and educational centers, medical centers, and classes across the state of Kansas. Two branch campuses are in the Kansas City metropolitan area on the Kansas side: the university's medical school and hospital in Kansas City, the Edwards Campus in Overland Park, and a hospital and research center in the state's capital of Topeka. There are also educational and research sites in Garden City, Hays, Leavenworth, Parsons, and Topeka, and branches of the medical school in Salina and Wichita. The university is one of the 62 members of the Association of American Universities. Founded March 21, 1865, the university was opened in 1866, under a charter granted by the Kansas State Legislature in 1864 and legislation passed in 1863 under the State Constitution, which was adopted two years after the 1861 admission of the former Kansas Territory as the 34th state into the Union. Disputes over Kansas' establishment as a free or slaveholding state prior to admission to the union prompted an internal civil war known as "Bleeding Kansas" during the 1850s.

New invention keeps qubits of light stable at room temperature

“Researchers from University of Copenhagen have developed a new technique that keeps quantum bits of light stable at room temperature instead of only working at -270 degrees. Their discovery saves power and money and is a breakthrough in quantum research …

Study reveals new details on what happened in the first microsecond of Big Bang

“Researchers from University of Copenhagen have investigated what happened to a specific kind of plasma – the first matter ever to be present - during the first microsecond of Big Bang. Their findings provide a piece of the puzzle to the evolution …

Major breakthrough: Copenhagen researchers can now achieve ‘quantum advantage’

“University of Copenhagen researchers have advanced their quantum technology to such a degree that classical computing technology can no longer keep up. They have developed a chip that, with financial backing, could be scaled up and used to build the …

Chemist uses CO2 to convert seawater into drinking water

“A University of Copenhagen chemist has invented a cutting-edge green technology that uses CO2 to convert seawater into drinking water — within minutes. The plan is to use the desalination technology to replace electricity with CO2 and use it in survival …

Extracting order from a quantum measurement finally shown experimentally

“In physics, it is essential to be able to show a theoretical assumption in actual, physical experiments. For more than a hundred years, physicists have been aware of the link between the concepts of disorder in a system, and information …

University of Copenhagen researchers realize new platform for future quantum computer

“University of Copenhagen physicists, as part of the University and Microsoft collaboration focused on topological quantum computing, may have unloosed a Gordian knot in quantum computer development. In partnership with researchers from University of Chicago, ETH Zurich, Weizmann Institute of …

Quantum research unifies two ideas offering an alternative route to topological superconductivity

“Researchers from University of Copenhagen have discovered a new way of developing topological superconductivity that may provide a useful route toward the use of Majorana zero modes as the foundation of qubits for quantum information. A pencil shaped semiconductor, measuring …

Quantum-entangled light from a vibrating membrane

“Entanglement, a powerful form of correlation among quantum systems, is an important resource for quantum computing. Researchers from the Quantum Optomechanics group at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, recently entangled two laser beams through bouncing them off the …

Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists

“University of Copenhagen researchers have developed a nanocomponent that emits light particles carrying quantum information. Less than one-tenth the width of a human hair, the miniscule component makes it possible to scale up and could ultimately reach the capabilities required …

An important step towards completely secure quantum communication networks

“The quest for a secure information network is on. Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have recently succeeded in boosting the storage time of quantum information, using a small glass container filled with room temperature atoms, taking …