Content for BNL.Edu

BNL.Edu

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory located in Upton, New York, on Long Island, and was formally established in 1947 at the site of Camp Upton, a former U.S. Army base. Its name stems from its location within the Town of Brookhaven, approximately 60 miles east of New York City. Research at BNL specializes in nuclear and high energy physics, energy science and technology, environmental and bioscience, nanoscience and national security. The 5,300 acre campus contains several large research facilities, including the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and National Synchrotron Light Source II. Seven Nobel prizes have been awarded for work conducted at Brookhaven lab.

How to Train Your Magnet

“New accelerator magnets are undergoing a rigorous training program to prepare them for the extreme conditions inside the upgraded Large Hadron Collider When training for a marathon, runners must gradually ramp up the distance of their runs. They know that …

Connecting the Dots Between Material Properties and Qubit Performance

“Brookhaven Lab and Princeton scientists team up to identify sources of loss of quantum information at the atomic scale. Engineers and materials scientists studying superconducting quantum information bits (qubits)—a leading quantum computing material platform based on the frictionless flow …

Layered Graphene with a Twist Displays Unique Quantum Confinement in 2-D

“Understanding how electrons move in 2-D layered material systems could lead to advances in quantum computing and communication Scientists studying two different configurations of bilayer graphene—the two-dimensional (2-D), atom-thin form of carbon—have detected electronic and optical interlayer resonances …

Collisions of Light Produce Matter/Antimatter from Pure Energy

“Study demonstrates a long-predicted process for generating matter directly from light — plus evidence that magnetism can bend polarized photons along different paths in a vacuum Scientists studying particle collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—a U.S. Department …

Lighting Up Ultrafast Magnetism in a Metal Oxide

“Understanding how magnetic correlations change over very short timescales could be harnessed to control magnetism for applications including data storage and superconductivity What happens when very short pulses of laser light strike a magnetic material? A large international collaboration led …

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA

“Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices. Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructured materials—those with complex shapes at a size scale of billionths of …

A New Approach for Studying Electric Charge Arrangements in a Superconductor

“X-ray scattering yields new information on “charge density waves” High-temperature superconductors are a class of materials that can conduct electricity with almost zero resistance at temperatures that are relatively high compared to their standard counterparts, which must be chilled to …

Quirky Response to Magnetism Presents Quantum Physics Mystery

“The search is on to discover new states of matter, and possibly new ways of encoding, manipulating, and transporting information. One goal is to harness materials’ quantum properties for communications that go beyond what’s possible with conventional electronics. Topological …

Physicists Publish Worldwide Consensus of Muon Magnetic Moment Calculation

“For decades, scientists studying the muon have been puzzled by a strange pattern in the way muons rotate in magnetic fields, one that left physicists wondering if it can be explained by the Standard Model — the best tool physicists have …

Electrons Break Rotational Symmetry in Exotic Low-Temp Superconductor

“Scientists previously observed this peculiar behavior—characterized by electrons preferentially traveling along one direction, decoupled from the host crystal structure—in other materials whose ability to conduct electricity without energy loss cannot be explained by standard theoretical frameworks Scientists have …