The pace of innovation in the tech industry never ceases to amaze me. If you go back even five years, a “thin” laptop was still more than 20 mm, 4K content was only starting to take off and Oculus was kicking off its Kickstarter campaign. Compare that with today: Laptops are less than 11 mm, 4K content is pervasive and, with the advent of Windows* Mixed Reality, VR is being baked right into the operating system people use every day. This is particularly relevant as we get ready for today’s solar eclipse. The last time we experienced an eclipse like this was almost 100 years ago. If you weren’t directly in its path, you would miss it entirely – assuming you even knew it was happening in the first place. Now, people from all over the world can be part of the moment, and a huge number of them will be using their computer. But for those 450 million people using a machine that is more than five years old, the experience will be vastly different. Vastly compromised. Because they won’t be able to see the eclipse in the breathtaking level of detail that is possible, from the initial livestream to the vivid imagery people will create and share in the days to come.”

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