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Observing hydrogen’s effects in metal

Observing hydrogen’s effects in metal

“Microscopy technique could help researchers design safer reactor vessels or hydrogen storage tanks. Hydrogen, the second-tiniest of all atoms, can penetrate right into the crystal structure of a solid metal. That’s good news for efforts to store hydrogen fuel …

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Engineers program marine robots to take calculated risks

Engineers program marine robots to take calculated risks

“Algorithm could help autonomous underwater vehicles explore risky but scientifically-rewarding environments. We know far less about the Earth’s oceans than we do about the surface of the moon or Mars. The sea floor is carved with expansive canyons, towering …

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Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials

Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials

“Device made from flexible, inexpensive materials could power large-area electronics, wearables, medical devices, and more. Imagine a world where smartphones, laptops, wearables, and other electronics are powered without batteries. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have taken a step in that …

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Controllable fast, tiny magnetic bits

Controllable fast, tiny magnetic bits

“MIT researchers show how to make and drive nanoscale magnetic quasi-particles known as skyrmions for spintronic memory devices. For many modern technical applications, such as superconducting wires for magnetic resonance imaging, engineers want as much as possible to get rid …

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Customizing computer-aided design

Customizing computer-aided design

“System breaks down complex designs into easily modifiable shapes for custom manufacturing and 3-D printing. MIT researchers have devised a technique that “reverse engineers” complex 3-D computer-aided design (CAD) models, making them far easier for users to customize for manufacturing …

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DNA design that anyone can do

DNA design that anyone can do

“Computer program can translate a free-form 2-D drawing into a DNA structure. Researchers at MIT and Arizona State University have designed a computer program that allows users to translate any free-form drawing into a two-dimensional, nanoscale structure made of DNA …

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